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HEALTH & SAFETY

Full Resources Coming Soon:

  • Developing a Health & Safety Management System

  • Health & Safety at Work Act 2015 Key Facts

  • Basic H&S Manual Template

  • Truck Safety Inspection Template

  • Incident Report Template

  • Managing Logbooks and Electronic Logbooks

  • Driving Hours

  • Managing speed and preventing rollovers

  • Chain of Responsibility

  • Driver Health & Wellbeing

  • Investing in Telematics

August is Health and Safety Month, brought to you by NTA And Safe Business Solutions. Throughout August we will be posting free information, tips and resources in this section to encourage our industry to bring Health & Safety to the forefront of people's minds. It is everyone's responsibility to achieve a safe workplace and to prioritise health and wellbeing within your team. Keep an eye on our social media posts and download the resources here. If you would like more extensive access and information beyond August consider joining the Association

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WEEK 1 - FLEET MANAGEMENT
 
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  • Transportation contributes 5% of the National GDP

  • Approximately 108,000 people work in the transportation industry in NZ (4% of NZ workforce)

  • The majority of those workers are in road transport (40%)

  • There are approximately 800,000 licensed trucks in NZ and 3.5 million passenger vehicles.

 

(data from NZTA)

As a best practice collecting and reviewing data about your vehicles, drivers and mechanics should be a key element in your health and safety system. At a minimum companies should be collecting the following information:

 

  • Fuel usage: Including fuelling dates and locations, fuel type, quantity, and cost.

  • Maintenance: Scheduled maintenance and unscheduled repairs. Include data on the work required, maintenance dates, the parts required, the parts’ costs, and labour costs.

  • Purchasing and leasing: The contract and warranty details for each vehicle purchased.

  • Daily / Pre-Start Checks: ensure all vehicles, plant and machinery are checked by a competent person prior to use.

  • Utilisation: Who is signing out vehicles, as well as the time, date, and mileage of their trips. Make sure you record odometer readings.

  • Driver licensing: Licensing and certification dates.

  • Driver performance: The dates, times, locations, and nature of all accidents. Record which personnel were present and any insurance claim information.

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Safe Business Solutions has compiled a useful 8 step Fleet Management Checklist for fleet owners and operators.

 

Follow this checklist to ensure your company is maximising efficiency.

Considering the scale of the task, fleet management is best approached on a step-by-step basis. The following provides a foundational guide for efficient performance in all fleet management tasks. Any questions answered with a ‘no’ should be further examined until a solution is found.

Case studies can be a helpful way of understanding real world actions and consequences, and to learn from other’s mistakes.  This case has been drawn from a Worksafe Prosecution Court Summary file dated 27 August 2019. 

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Thanks to SBS, we are giving away a $50 BP fuel voucher at the end of each week in August, to one lucky person that completes the weekly quiz. Questions based on information that has come up during the week on our Facebook Page.

Transport Safety Advisor

Teletrac Navman have created a Practical Guide To Set Up And Manage A Safety Management System. This resource is free to download and covers:

 

  • How to create a comprehensive fleet safety program. Learn how to implements a safety program to ensure performance year-round.

  • Fleet safety checklist - 9 steps for minimising risk. Get a comprehensive 9-step checklist that can help you build a safety program along with a glossary of terms you should be familiar with.

  • How to use your fleet’s data to predict and prevent unsafe events. Learn the top three ways to use the insights collected by telematics to your benefit.

  • How to train and coach drivers on best safety practices. A number of tips for making driver data actionable through training programs.

  • 4 ways to lower costs and increase profits through safety management. Four ways that a comprehensive safety program can lower costs and increase profits.

WEEK 2 - TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT
 
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Traffic Management Stats (Data collected from Worksafe NZ and Australia OHS)

 

 

  • A road workers study in NZ and OZ found that on average there is one near miss per week
     

  • Between 2011-2019 20 people died from vehicle incidents related to road works and construction
     

  • There has already been one traffic management fatality in 2021

Traffic Management Plans

 

The layout and traffic flow of a workplace is important in keeping people and plant safe as they move around. Consider:

  • One way systems.

  • Well marked road/pedestrian areas.

  • Training and inductions for staff and visitors on pedestrian areas and traffic flows.

  • Mirrors on blind spots.

  • Separate entrances for people and plant.

  • Designated crossing points.

  • Sufficient lighting.

  • Speed management (bumps, signage).

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Do you always have a plan?

Safe Business Solutions have developed a helpful Traffic Management checklist you can download for free. If you need further help developing a plan contact us and we will put you in touch with SBS.

Week 2 Quiz

Thanks to SBS, we are giving away a $50 BP fuel voucher at the end of each week in August, to one lucky person that completes the weekly quiz. Questions based on information that has come up during the week on our Facebook Page.

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Case Study

The Situation: Five separate PCBU’s operated within a single large worksite; the land/property owner, the tenant, the facility management, the transport/logistics operator and a contractor (tradesman)

 

The Worksite: The worksite was a complex distribution facility, with a number of separate chilled storage unts, where a number of transport/logistics operators unloaded and loaded chilled goods for distribution across New Zealand. The site had no Traffic Management Plan in place, in that all PCBU’s were clear on any expectations and their own areas of responsibilities.

The Event: A tradesman was contracted to conduct maintenance onsite in a large, chilled storage room. He was working from a step ladder for a number of hours when a forklift operator entered the chiller room with his forklift, came into contact with the ladder and the tradesman was knocked to the floor sustaining serious head injuries.

 

Read what happened and who was responsible.

WEEK 3 - Drugs, Alcohol, Fatigue
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Vehicle Accident Statistics

 

In 2019:

  • There was 352 vehicle related deaths in NZ (almost 1 per day)

  • 196 involved drugs, alcohol or fatigue (50%)

  • 35 were work related (1 out of 10)

  • 67 involved transport trucks (1 out of 5)

  • 87 involved speeding (1 out of 4)

 

Data collected from Worksafe and NZ Ministry of Transport

Here is a snap shot of some things that you might not have thought of. Its far better to have good plans in place than be faced with Indirect - Uninsured, hidden and business costs

  • Lost time for injured worker(s)

  • Overtime for other workers

  • Accident investigation time

  • Missed customer delivery costs

  • Lost production costs

  • Overhead costs while work was disrupted

  • Mental health costs

  • Employee morale

  • Legal and consultant costs

  • Other miscellaneous costs…

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Very strict regulations exist around drug and alcohol testing in the workplace. Employers should have a clear and comprehensive policy in place around drugs/alcohol and associated testing and follow it to the letter in the event a scenario arises. Personal grievances usually arise when either the company doesn’t have an adequate policy or has deviated from its own Drug & Alcohol procedures. Check out the Employer Checklist for Company Drug & Alcohol Procedures. If you want help establishing one for your business contact us and we will put you in touch with the team at Safe Business Solutions.

Thanks to SBS, we are giving away a $50 BP fuel voucher at the end of each week in August, to one lucky person that completes the weekly quiz. Questions based on information that has come up during the week on our Facebook Page.

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The Situation: A business in the agriculture sector recently suspected an employee was under the influence of drugs. The employee’s behaviour had recently become unpredictable, argumentative and he was frequently absent from work with unacceptable excuses. The employer decided they should send the employee for a drug test with an accredited drug and alcohol testing provider. They requested the employee take a drug test.

The Unexpected Surprise: The employee refused to take a drug test stating his Individual Employment Agreement (IEA) referred to a Drug and Alcohol Policy he had not seen nor been given access to. The company owner panicked and tried to introduce the Drug and Alcohol Policy in the moment, thinking this would give them the ability to test. The company gave the employee a copy of the Drug and Alcohol policy to read and an (unreasonable) deadline of 24 hours in which to do so. The following day the employee was requested to sign his acceptance of the new Drug and Alcohol Policy, which he had not been given a reasonable opportunity to seek advice on.

 

Find out what happened

WEEK 4 - ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS
 
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Workplace Investigations Stats: Reported Incidents

 

  • There were 1485 reported incidents in 2020

  • To date in 2021 there have been 673 incidents

  • The top 3 locations for workplace incidents are Auckland, Canterbury and Taranaki

  • Construction has the highest number of reported incidents, transportation is 4th

 

 

See these stats on the Worksafe website

Key elements of a fair workplace investigation

 

These will vary based on the facts. However, the basics are that:

 

  • An employee should be told details of the allegations - getting the timing right for this can be challenging. You need to have enough information to feel confident that you have an issue, without effectively undertaking a full investigation before you advise the employee. Usually, once an employer feels that there is an issue to be answered, it is appropriate to put this to the employee and advise that an investigation will be undertaken. However, in some situations, eg where there is information that could be destroyed or people threatened, you may want to have these matters resolved before having a conversation with the employee.

  • An employee should be given a reasonable opportunity to respond.

  • Any explanations should be fully considered before conclusions are made.

An investigation’s purpose is to establish the facts; it’s not to make or influence the decision on any action to be taken. Read more here

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Have a good Checklist

Safe Business Solutions have developed a helpful Accident Investigation checklist you can download for free. If you need further help developing a plan contact us and we will put you in touch with SBS.

Week 4 Quiz

Thanks to SBS, we are giving away a $50 BP fuel voucher at the end of each week in August, to one lucky person that completes the weekly quiz. Questions based on information that has come up during the week on our Facebook Page.

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Case Study

The Situation:

John, a Driver, arrived on site at a distribution centre to collect loaded pallets for delivery of goods to stores. Upon arriving on site John met Alex, who was loading the pallets with goods and placing them onto the back of a curtain-sided trailer for delivery out to stores. John was unhappy with the way the goods had been stacked on the pallets and in the back of the trailer.  He attempted to raise his concerns several times.  

 

 

Read what happened next.